Florida’s Statutory Sovereign Immunity Language Inserted Into Any Government Liability Policy Takes Precedence Over the Policy’s Definition of “Occurrence”

In Florida, as in most jurisdictions, government agencies may be subject to liability for tortious acts, with the recovery limit capped by law. A recent decision, State of Florida v. Barnett, explores the recent conflict regarding the limit of recovery against a state agency for an “occurrence” involving multiple claimants. Section 768.28(5), Florida Statutes (2010), states in relevant part as follows: Neither the state nor its agencies or subdivisions shall be liable to pay a claim or a judgment by
Continue reading...

This is No “Accident”: Ohio Court Rules CGL Policy Doesn’t Cover Shoddy Subcontractor Work

One of the ongoing battles in construction defect coverage law around the country is whether a general contractor’s commercial general liability (“CGL”) policy obligates the insurer to defend and indemnify the general contractor in a lawsuit based on faulty work performed—not by the general contractor—but on its behalf by a subcontractor. Yesterday, Ohio joined a small minority of states when its high court ruled that damage from a subcontractor’s faulty work is not an accident triggering an insurer’s defense obligation.
Continue reading...

Pennsylvania District Court Finds No Coverage for Faulty Workmanship

In State Farm Fire & Casualty Co. v. McDermott (E.D. Pa. Oct. 14, 2014), a Pennsylvania federal district court recognized the well-established rule in Pennsylvania that faulty workmanship resulting in construction defects is not caused by an “occurrence.”  This coverage dispute arose out of work performed by McDermott at a residential housing development.  After McDermott completed its work on windows and doors, the homeowners discovered water intrusion.  They sued the developer, which, in turn, sued McDermott for negligence and breach
Continue reading...